1. Articles from Bloomberg

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    1. The Preposterous Success Story of America’s Pillow King

      The Preposterous Success Story of America’s Pillow King

      As so many great entrepreneurial success stories do, the tale of Mike Lindell begins in a crack house. It was the fall of 2008, and the then 47-year-old divorced father of four from the Minneapolis suburbs had run out of crack, again. He had been up for either 14 or 19 days—he swears it was 19 but says 14 because “19 just sounds like I’ve embellished”—trying to save his struggling startup and making regular trips into the city to visit his dealer, Ty.

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    2. Inside the Trump Bunker, With 12 Days to Go

      Inside the Trump Bunker, With 12 Days to Go

      On Oct. 19, as the third and final presidential debate gets going in Las Vegas, Donald Trump’s Facebook and Twitter feeds are being manned by Brad Parscale, a San Antonio marketing entrepreneur, whose buzz cut and long narrow beard make him look like a mixed martial arts fighter. His Trump tie has been paired with a dark Zegna suit. A lapel pin issued by the Secret Service signals his status. He’s equipped with a dashboard of 400 prewritten Trump tweets.

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    3. How MusclePharm Went From Swole to Twig

      How MusclePharm Went From Swole to Twig

      Brad Pyatt was golfing at the Phoenician, a resort in Scottsdale, Ariz., when he decided to go after Arnold Schwarzenegger. It was the spring of 2013. Pyatt had picked the Phoenician—set against the southeastern slope of Camelback Mountain, a jagged pile of granite and sandstone sprinkled with saguaro cactus—to host an executive retreat for MusclePharm, the sports-nutrition company he’d founded five years earlier.

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    4. $10 Million Says Hillary Wins

      $10 Million Says Hillary Wins

      Haim Saban, the billionaire chairman of Univision Communications, America’s largest Spanish-language media company, flew to Jerusalem in his private jet on Sept. 29 to attend the funeral of his friend Shimon Peres, Israel’s former prime minister. It was an event attended by numerous world leaders. Saban gave one of them a lift: former U.S. President Bill Clinton. In Saban’s telling, it wasn’t a big deal.

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    5. Mexico’s Richest Man Wants a Three-Day Workweek - Bloomberg

      Mexico’s Richest Man Wants a Three-Day Workweek - Bloomberg

      The following is a condensed and edited interview with Carlos Slim, chairman emeritus, América Móvil. Can you tell us about your plan for shorter workweeks? Shorter workweeks are a solution to civilization shifts. Historically, the more technology advances and the more progress there is, people work less. What’s happening now is that people live longer, in better health, and without the need for physical effort. This civilization demands more knowledge, more experience, less physical exertion.

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    6. Welcome to Larry Page’s Secret Flying Car Factories - Bloomberg

      Welcome to Larry Page’s Secret Flying Car Factories - Bloomberg

      Three years ago, Silicon Valley developed a fleeting infatuation with a startup called Zee.Aero. The company had set up shop right next to Google’s headquarters in Mountain View, Calif., which was curious, because Google tightly controls most of the land in the area. Then a reporter spotted patent filings showing Zee.Aero was working on a small, all-electric plane that could take off and land vertically—a flying car.

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    7. The Brutal Journey Back to Work for Millions of American

      The Brutal Journey Back to Work for Millions of American

      Phyllis Swenson recognizes the financial breaking point. She sees it in the faces of people who seek shelter at her church. She hears it when they call there asking for food, a spare gift card, anything. Now, the shadow of unemployment and loss is stalking her. “It’s scary,” says Swenson, who recently received a foreclosure notice on her home. The 63-year-old Fairfax, Virginia, resident is among millions of Americans who haven’t rebounded with the improving U.S. economy.

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    8. Can Paraguay Escape Decades of Despotism, Ineptitude, and Corruption?

      Can Paraguay Escape Decades of Despotism, Ineptitude, and Corruption?

      Last fall, New York University sponsored a lecture entitled “Introducing Paraguay: A Land of Opportunity.” It was an offering that until recently might have produced shrugs of indifference, or snickering about the country’s tawdry history: Opportunities for whom? Dictators? Smugglers? Nazis? But here was the president of Paraguay, stepping to the lectern to deliver that speech as 150 students, professors, and distinguished guests applauded.

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    9. How GE Exorcised the Ghost of Jack Welch to Become a 124-Year-Old Startup

      How GE Exorcised the Ghost of Jack Welch to Become a 124-Year-Old Startup

      Overlooking the Hudson River in Ossining, N.Y., there’s a grassy, 59-acre campus owned by General Electric. It’s an executive training center where the company holds management and leadership classes, some of them led by the chief executive himself. Jack Welch, who ran GE in the 1980s and ’90s, would arrive by helicopter. He’d make his way to a windowless auditorium known as the Pit where a group of managers waited.

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    10. The Incredible Rise and Final Hours of Fracking King Aubrey McClendon

      The Incredible Rise and Final Hours of Fracking King Aubrey McClendon

      Aubrey McClendon, the co-founder of Chesapeake Energy, liked to sneak Champagne into movie theaters on date nights with his wife. They’d pour it over cups of ice they bought at the concession stand and sip away in the dark. At the height of a gas boom he and Chesapeake did as much as any to inflate, he rode a natural-gas-fueled motorcycle and wore ties decorated with miniature drilling rigs.

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    11. Q&A With Jamie Dimon on the Future of Finance

      Q&A With Jamie Dimon on the Future of Finance

      John Micklethwait: Your career has seen a host of companies trying to challenge the status quo in finance; some have succeeded, others fail. The new threat is Silicon Valley. All kinds of fintech startups are coming for Wall Street. Where do you feel most vulnerable? Jamie Dimon: Let me just give you the big picture first. The best way to look at any business is from the standpoint of the clients. So there are these certain basic things that aren’t going to change.

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    12. Why Big Business Is Brushing Off Campaign Trail Rage

      Why Big Business Is Brushing Off Campaign Trail Rage

      You might have expected business to mount a vigorous defense. But corporate America has responded to the charges with murmurs. In this gladiators’ match, one side simply hasn’t shown up. Many chief executive officers believe that after the election is over and the noise of the campaign dies down, it will be business as usual for business. For now, they are turning the other cheek.

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    13. The South China Tiger Is Functionally Extinct. Stuart Bray Has 19 of Them

      The South China Tiger Is Functionally Extinct. Stuart Bray Has 19 of Them

      On the highway south of Bloemfontein, South Africa, Stuart Bray sits in the back seat of a safari truck, sweating in jeans and boots in the 100-degree heat of a December afternoon. Bray and his driver have just picked up two Chinese government officials from the airport, and now they’re wedged in next to him, their expressions hidden by sunglasses. As they drive, the only landmarks are dusty sheep farms and the occasional ostrich.

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    14. How Tech Startup Founders Are Hacking Immigration

      How Tech Startup Founders Are Hacking Immigration

      Standing under fluorescent lights at a San Francisco hospital, employees of Medisas Inc. were celebrating the debut of their medical records software. It was the product of two years of planning, coding, and countless meetings with hospital administrators, all driven by Gautam Sivakumar, the startup’s founder and chief executive officer. But Sivakumar spent that day at a computer in his childhood bedroom in England.

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    15. The Real Life Storage Wars

      The Real Life Storage Wars

      A warehouse worker at storage startup RedBin spent 75 minutes on a recent morning piloting a van from company headquarters on the Brooklyn waterfront to an apartment building in Harlem, where he dropped off two empty plastic boxes. Then he drove back to Brooklyn. Four days later, RedBin dispatched another van to retrieve the containers, now full, which the company will store for $5 per box per month.

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    16. The Feel-Good Female Solidarity Machine

      The Feel-Good Female Solidarity Machine

      The first sign that one is at a women’s empowerment conference is that there are women on the stage at all—the all-male panel discussion remains an inescapable part of modern life. The second sign is the footwear. Picture a horizontal line of 4-inch stilettos, dangling at the eye level of the audience, as the women wearing them sit perched on stools.

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    17. The Super Bowl Coin Toss Has a Dark Secret

      The Super Bowl Coin Toss Has a Dark Secret

      Just before the start of Super Bowl XLII, as he stood on the 50-yard line of the University of Phoenix Stadium in front of 70,101 impatient fans, head referee Mike Carey was nervous. Not about reaching the highest honor his profession has to offer. Not about blowing a call before a TV audience of 100 million people. What worried Carey on Feb. 3, 2008, was the coin toss.

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    18. You Can Buy a Czech Castle for $13,000

      You Can Buy a Czech Castle for $13,000

      The Libejovice chateau looks like something out of a 19th century romantic novel: an elegant, mustard-hued Renaissance palace with tall windows and elaborate balcony railings bearing the noble Schwarzenberg family’s coat of arms. Natalia Makovik will sell it to you for less than the price of some Manhattan studio apartments. The catch: Restoring the place, a two-hour drive south of Prague, could cost 10 times the purchase price.

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    19. Inside the Plan to Pull Sprint Out of Its Death Spiral

      Inside the Plan to Pull Sprint Out of Its Death Spiral

      Marcelo Claure is a 6-foot-6-inch Bolivian who came to the U.S. 20 years ago and co-founded a company that sold mobile phones. Brightstar was based in Miami, where he partied with Jennifer Lopez and tried to establish a professional soccer franchise with David Beckham. As Brightstar expanded around the world, Claure befriended a top executive at SoftBank, the giant Japanese telecom and Internet company.

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    20. Why Doesn't Silicon Valley Hire Black Coders?

      Why Doesn't Silicon Valley Hire Black Coders?

      In the fall of 2013 a young software engineer named Charles Pratt arrived on Howard University’s campus in Washington. His employer, Google, had sent him there to cultivate future Silicon Valley programmers. It represented a warming of the Valley’s attitude toward Howard, where more than 8 out of 10 students are black. The chair of the computer science department, Legand Burge, had spent almost a decade inviting tech companies to hire his graduates, but they’d mostly ignored him.

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    21. This Football Helmet Crumples—and That’s Good

      This Football Helmet Crumples—and That’s Good

      Dave Marver crouches in his Seattle office, brandishing two black football helmets that look pretty much alike. One is made by Riddell, the nation’s best-selling helmet manufacturer. The other is a prototype made by Vicis, the startup company for which Marver is chief executive. He slams the crown of the Riddell model onto the concrete floor, producing the familiar violent crack of a strong safety blindsiding a wide receiver. Then Marver bangs his own company’s helmet down.

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    22. The Video Accusing Gravity CEO Dan Price of Domestic Abuse Won’t Be Published

      The Video Accusing Gravity CEO Dan Price of Domestic Abuse Won’t Be Published

      In late October, the ex-wife of entrepreneur Dan Price gave a public talk alleging that she had been physically abused by her former husband. A video of the talk, part of a TEDx event at the University of Kentucky, was scheduled to be posted online this month. But after a representative for Price, chief executive officer of Gravity Payments, contacted the university, it decided not to make the video public.

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    1-24 of 66 1 2 3 »
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