1. 1-21 of 21
    1. How to Manage Someone Who Thinks Everything Is Urgent

      How to Manage Someone Who Thinks Everything Is Urgent

      We’ve all been in situations in which we couldn’t wait for a slow-moving or overly cautious employee to take action. But at the other extreme, some employees have such a deep need to get things resolved that they move too quickly, too intensely, and make a mess. They may make a bad deal just to be able to say they’ve made the deal, or issue a directive without thinking through the ramifications just to say they’ve handled a problem decisively.

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    2. New Managers Should Focus on Helping Their Teams, Not Pleasing Their Bosses

      Most newly appointed managers quickly realize that the skills and qualities that earned them the promotion are very different from those that will serve them well as a leader. But in an effort to prove their mettle, they focus their attention upward, to their own higher ups, when they should be spending more time focusing on their new team. This “asymmetry of attention” can get new managers in a lot of trouble.

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    3. When You Should Quit Your Job Without Having Another One Lined Up

      When You Should Quit Your Job Without Having Another One Lined Up

      People hate to resign without another job lined up. Not just because employers prefer to hire people who are working, but also because it feels like failure. It seems as if you “couldn’t take it.” But, there are times when it is very important to just let go: 1) When you believe something illegal or unethical is going on at work and you are concerned it will reflect badly on you, and 2) When your current job is negatively affecting your health and your life outside of work.

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    4. We Overcommit Because We Don’t Want to Disappoint. But Then We Disappoint Because We’re Overcommitted

      We Overcommit Because We Don’t Want to Disappoint. But Then We Disappoint Because We’re Overcommitted

      We live in a culture of “yes.” We don’t want to disappoint our bosses, colleagues, families, or friends, so we say “yes” as often as we can manage. But when we overcommit ourselves, we spend our time checking things off a list rather than actually creating value. Without the ability to say “no” to low-level tasks in order to say “yes” to groundbreaking ones, people stop innovating.

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      Mentions: Steve Jobs
    5. The Biggest Mistakes New Executives Make

      The Biggest Mistakes New Executives Make

      Within the first 18 months, there’s a 50% chance a new executive will leave the organization. While some cite poor cultural fit, inadequate onboarding, or the lack of appropriate expectations as the cause, in reality, many new executives inadvertently set themselves up for failure within the first few months of their tenure by falling into common traps: Organizations invest a lot of time and money in hiring the right CEO or senior executive to set a vision and make the changes in their company.

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    6. How to Spark Creativity When You’re in a Rut

      How to Spark Creativity When You’re in a Rut

      Creativity is something everyone has when they are confronted with something new, new problems to solve, new ideas to think about. It’s not just for the talented few painters or artists. People are naturally creative and inventive. But creativity can fade when you get bored or discouraged. To get your creative juices flowing again, make an effort to try something new every month. Meet new people at work. Talk to new clients.

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    7. Responding to Feedback You Disagree With

      Responding to Feedback You Disagree With

      Maybe it’s your performance review. Or (unsolicited) advice from a colleague. Whatever it was, it was wrong. Getting feedback that seems just plain wrong can be isolating, painful, and maddening. What should you do when this happens to you? Don’t decide whether or not you agree with the feedback right away. This isn’t easy. But you need to give yourself time to understand the feedback before you accept or reject it.

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    8. When You Agree to a Networking Meeting But Don’t Know What You’re Going to Talk About

      When You Agree to a Networking Meeting But Don’t Know What You’re Going to Talk About

      For some networking meetings, the agenda is obvious: your companies are considering doing business together, or you’re looking for a job and this person might help you get one. But many professionals often find themselves in networking meetings where the goals are murkier. Perhaps a friend thought you’d hit it off and introduced you, or you met the person briefly at an event and they’re following up for indeterminate reasons. In some cases, you’ll want to decline the invitation.

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    9. The Pros and Cons of Competition Among Employees

      The Pros and Cons of Competition Among Employees

      New research shows that the way in which leaders communicate about competition can make employees experience either anxiety or excitement, and those feelings influence whether they react positively or negatively. When employees feel excited, they’re more likely to come up with creative solutions. When they feel anxious, they’re more likely to cut corners or sabotage one another.

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      Mentions: new york times
    10. 3 Ways to Make Time for the Little Tasks You Never Make Time For

      3 Ways to Make Time for the Little Tasks You Never Make Time For

      We’d all like to spend our time at work on high-value activities: setting strategy, fostering innovation, mentoring promising employees, and more. But every professional faces a relentless deluge of niggling tasks — the overflowing inbox, the introductions you promised to make, the stack of paperwork you have to file, or the articles you really ought to read.

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      Mentions: New York
    11. What to Do When You and Your Boss Aren’t Getting Along

      What to Do When You and Your Boss Aren’t Getting Along

      Even the best office relationships hit a rut, but if it’s your relationship with your boss that’s suffering, work can be especially challenging. Maybe you’ve lost their trust, or you haven’t been seeing eye to eye lately, or maybe you’ve never really gotten along. Whatever the reason, how can you build a connection that’s more than “just OK”? What steps can you take to improve your interactions? And are there times when you have to accept that the relationship may never get better?

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    12. How to Make Your One-on-Ones with Employees More Productive

      How to Make Your One-on-Ones with Employees More Productive

      One-on-one meetings with direct reports often feel more hurried and disorganized than they need to be. It’s important to check in regularly with each of your employees, but how can you make the best use of the time? How can you make the meetings more productive and collaborative? What do you need to change as the manager and what do you need to ask your direct report to do differently as well?

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    13. Getting Your Career Back on Track After a Catastrophic Error

      Getting Your Career Back on Track After a Catastrophic Error

      Everyone makes mistakes at work. But some people’s errors in judgment have huge implications, resulting in public firings or forced resignations. Even people who make serious mistakes have to earn a living. How do you recover professionally from a terrible error in judgment? First of all, recognize that you’re not alone. In December 2015 the New York Times reported that many of Wall Street’s best and brightest attended a fundraising dinner at the Hilton’s New York Grand Ballroom.

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    14. The Paradox of Workplace Productivity

      The Paradox of Workplace Productivity

      At its most basic, productivity is the amount of value produced divided by the amount of cost (or time) required to do so. And while this equation seems simple enough on the surface, the strategies for optimizing it have evolved dramatically over the last two decades. Technology has enabled massive personal productivity gains — computers, spreadsheets, email, and other advances have made it possible for a knowledge worker to seemingly produce more in a day then was previously possible in a year.

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    15. Fending Off a Colleague Who Keeps Wasting Your Time

      Fending Off a Colleague Who Keeps Wasting Your Time

      No one intends for their communication to be a burden; it’s not like people leave voicemails with the express purpose of distracting you from your most important work. And yet far too often that’s the result. You receive their missives with dread because each one entails more time expended and new obligations that you’ve been dragooned into. It’s not malice that leads some people to overtax your inbox or waste your time.

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    16. An Antidote to Incivility

      An Antidote to Incivility

      Porath has identified some tactics to minimize the effects of rudeness on performance and health. The most effective remedy, she says, is to work holistically on your well-being, rather than trying to change the perpetrator or the relationship. She suggests a two-pronged approach: Take steps to thrive cognitively, which includes growth, momentum, and continual learning; and take steps to thrive affectively, which means experiencing passion, excitement, and vitality at work.

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      Mentions: Florida Midwest
    17. The Two Traits Every Entrepreneur Needs - Harvard Business Review

      The Two Traits Every Entrepreneur Needs - Harvard Business Review

      What are the most important attributes you need if you want to successfully launch a new business? Narrowing it down to just a handful of characteristics and behaviors is difficult — there are so many one needs to succeed as an entrepreneur . But if I ...

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      Mentions: IPO Albert Einstein
    18. When to Skip a Difficult Conversation

      When to Skip a Difficult Conversation

      Leaders know that they’ll occasionally need to give tough feedback to their employees, colleagues, and clients. And yet, no matter how skilled or experienced they are at it, most would also do anything to find a way out. As Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton and Sheila Heen explain in their book, Difficult Conversations, this internal struggle is natural: “If we try to avoid the problem, we’ll feel taken advantage of, our feelings will fester . . .

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    19. Learning to Learn

      Learning to Learn

      Over decades of work with managers, the author has found that people who do succeed at this kind of learning have four well-developed attributes: aspiration, self-awareness, curiosity, and vulnerability. They have a deep desire to understand and master new skills; they see themselves very clearly; they’re constantly thinking of and asking good questions; and they tolerate their own mistakes as they move up the curve.

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      Mentions: Asian
    1-21 of 21
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